Home Breaking News Prince Philip’s family arrive at Westminster Abbey for the Duke of Edinburgh’s...

Prince Philip’s family arrive at Westminster Abbey for the Duke of Edinburgh’s memorial service 

12

The extended family of Prince Philip – thought to be around 51 people from across Europe – were among the first to arrive at Westminster Abbey ahead of the ceremony to honour the late Duke’s life today. 

The Duke of Edinburgh’s family members, many travelling from overseas, have made the journey to London to represent the Greek, Danish and German branches of the late consort’s family. 

The representatives included the Hereditary Prince and Princess of Baden, who were also invited to Prince Philip’s funeral – which was limited to just 30 people – on April 17th 2021. 

The Baden royals had shared a close relationship with the Duke of Edinburgh throughout much of his life. 

Scroll down for video 

Extended family: It’s thought 51 members of Prince Philip’s extended family from across Europe have travelled to the service. From left: Stephanie Anne Kaul of Baden, Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden, Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Saskia Binder, Prince Philipp, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, Countess Floria Franziska Marie-Luisa Erika von Faber-Castell and Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse

The countess was seen in deep conversation with her neighbour in the Abbey as the assembly patiently waited for the service to start. From left: Stephanie Anne Kaul of Baden, Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden, Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Saskia Binder, Prince Philipp, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, Countess Floria Franziska Marie-Luisa Erika von Faber-Castell and Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse

The countess was seen in deep conversation with her neighbour in the Abbey as the assembly patiently waited for the service to start. From left: Stephanie Anne Kaul of Baden, Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden, Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Saskia Binder, Prince Philipp, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, Countess Floria Franziska Marie-Luisa Erika von Faber-Castell and Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse

Among the first guests to arrive at Westminster Abbey today were representatives of the Greek, Danish and German branches of the late Duke's family - including the Hereditary Prince and Princess of Baden

Among the first guests to arrive at Westminster Abbey today were representatives of the Greek, Danish and German branches of the late Duke’s family – including the Hereditary Prince and Princess of Baden

Seated in the far right of the Abbey in the front row this morning were the Hereditary Prince and Princess of Baden, close confidants of the late Duke of Edinburgh Prince Bernhard, pictured with his wife at the wedding of the Prince and Princess of Monaco in 2011, is the grandson of the late Duke's sister Theodora

Great nephew: Seated in the far right of the Abbey in the front row this morning were the Hereditary Prince and Princess of Baden, close confidants of the late Duke of Edinburgh. Right: Prince Bernhard, pictured with his wife at the wedding of the Prince and Princess of Monaco in 2011, is the grandson of the late Duke’s sister Theodora

Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, pictured today Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, pictured with Prince Charles, said: ‘It really is an incredible honour and we are all extremely touched and privileged to be included on behalf of the wider family'

Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, pictured today left and right with Prince Charles, said: ‘It really is an incredible honour and we are all extremely touched and privileged to be included on behalf of the wider family’

Also in attendance was Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse, known as 'Don', 54, is the head of the House of Hesse, into which the Duke's two younger sisters, Cecile and Sophie (known as 'Tiny') married. Donatus, Prince and Landgrave of Hesse is pictured with the Queen in 2014

Also in attendance was Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse, known as ‘Don’, 54, is the head of the House of Hesse, into which the Duke’s two younger sisters, Cecile and Sophie (known as ‘Tiny’) married. He is pictured left today and right with the Queen in 2014

Countess Mountbatten is pictured today The Duke of Edinburgh's carriage-driving companion - one of his closest confidantes - Countess Mountbatten of Burma (pictured together in 1975)

The Duke of Edinburgh’s carriage-driving companion – one of his closest confidantes – Countess Mountbatten of Burma (pictured left today and right together in 1975)

Arriving ahead of the Queen, who travelled to the ceremony with her disgraced son Prince Andrew from Windsor Castle to Westminster Abbey, Prince Philip’s more distant family members chatted quietly as they entered the Abbey. 

Sitting together, the family included  Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden and his wife Stephanie Anne Kaul of Baden.

They sat next to Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, the widow of Norton Knatchbull, 3rd Earl Mountbatten of Burma, a great-nephew of Prince Philip. 

On the other side of Penelope – a close confidante of Prince Philip who goes by Penny – was  Prince Philipp, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg and his wife Saskia Binder, a former banker.

Finishing off the row was Countess Floria Franziska Marie-Luisa Erika von Faber-Castell and Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse.

Bernhard, the Prince of Baden is the great nephew of Prince Philip. 

The father-of-three is a grandson of the Duke’s second sister, Theodora (known as ‘Dolla’).  

Bernhard and his wife were among the 30 mourners at his funeral last year.

Prince Philipp is another great-nephew of Prince Philip – and is the grandson of the late Duke’s sister Princess Margarita.

The cousins were among the 30 mourners invited to the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral last year.   Prince Philipp said at the time:  ‘It really is an incredible honour and we are all extremely touched and privileged to be included on behalf of the wider family’. 

His sister, and the Duke’s great niece, Princess Xenia of Hohenlohe-Langenburg also said Philip was an ‘idol’ for their family’s younger generation. 

Their grandmother, Princess Margarita, was the Duke’s elder sister and the Duke paid many visits to the family home, Langenburg Castle in southern Germany.   

41797108 9471993 image a 25 1618495524010

The German great-nephews and their wives who attended Prince Philip’s memorial 

Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden 

Prince Bernhard, 50, is a grandson of the Duke’s second sister, Theodora (known as ‘Dolla’).

Prince Philip’s German relatives were all denied a place at his wedding, thanks to post-war nervousness at Buckingham Palace. But for the rest of his life, the Duke of Edinburgh was adamant that bygones should be bygones.

That is why he made it clear that he wanted his ‘blood’ family — the network of German nieces, nephews and cousins to whom he was devoted — to be properly represented and included in his funeral arrangements.

He attended with his wife.  

Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg 

Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg was one of three members of the Duke’s European family who attended his funeral. He attended the memorial with his wife.

It was such a joy having a conversation with him. His memory was extraordinary,’ Prince Philipp said recently

‘He could remember playing hide-and-seek in the castle when he was a boy, and he always enjoyed talking to the local people.

‘He could switch from German to English and back, whether he was talking about Winston Churchill or the local wildlife.’ 

Prince Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse  

Prince Donatus, known as ‘Don’, 54, is the head of the House of Hesse, into which the Duke’s two younger sisters, Cecile and Sophie (known as ‘Tiny’) married.

He is a regular at the Royal Windsor Horse Show, spending time with the Duke of Edinburgh and the Queen. 

The Countess Mountbatten of Burma

One of Prince Philip’s closest friends and confidantes, Penny Brabourne, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, sat with his German relatives at the memorial. 

The Countess was a regular visitor at Wood Farm, the cottage on the edge of the Sandringham Estate in Norfolk where the Prince spent much of his time after retiring from public life in August 2017.

The pair were firm friends for decades and shared a love for the exhilarating equestrian sport of carriage-driving.

Indeed, the 67-year-old Countess enjoyed such a close bond with the Queen and Philip that Palace staff reportedly nicknamed her ‘and also’, because no guest list was considered complete without her.

The only daughter of butcher-turned-businessman Reginald Eastwood, she was propelled into the Royal Family through her marriage to Norton Knatchbull, 3rd Earl Mountbatten of Burma.

The Earl was a close friend of Prince Charles – the pair attended Gordonstoun together and Charles was Norton’s best man when he married Penny in 1979.

The wedding was delayed for eight weeks because five months earlier, IRA bombers blew up a small boat in the sea off Mullaghmore, County Sligo, killing Norton’s grandfather, Lord Mountbatten. Norton’s 14-year-old younger brother, Nicholas, his paternal grandmother the Dowager Lady Brabourne, and a local boy who was with the family, also died in the terror attack.

Penny is understood to have formed a close friendship with the Queen and Prince Philip after her daughter Leonora contracted liver cancer and died aged five in 1991.

Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg & Donatus, Prince and Landgrave of Hesse arrives to attend the memorial of Prince Philip

Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg & Donatus, Prince and Landgrave of Hesse arrives to attend the memorial of Prince Philip

The royal family, who joined the service shortly before its 11:30am start, were seated in the front pews of the Abbey

The royal family, who joined the service shortly before its 11:30am start, were seated in the front pews of the Abbey

Prince Philip's long-time friend, who is also known as Lady Romsey and Lady Brabourne took her seat, dressed in a sober grey ensemble with matching hat. From left: Stephanie Anne Kaul of Baden, Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden, Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Saskia Binder, Prince Philipp, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, Countess Floria Franziska Marie-Luisa Erika von Faber-Castell and Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse

Prince Philip’s long-time friend, who is also known as Lady Romsey and Lady Brabourne took her seat, dressed in a sober grey ensemble with matching hat. From left: Stephanie Anne Kaul of Baden, Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden, Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Saskia Binder, Prince Philipp, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, Countess Floria Franziska Marie-Luisa Erika von Faber-Castell and Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse

Gathered in the pews of Westminster Abbey, the extended family of Prince Philip, only a few of whom were invited to the scaled-down royal funeral in April 2021, greeted each other ahead of the memorial service today

Gathered in the pews of Westminster Abbey, the extended family of Prince Philip, only a few of whom were invited to the scaled-down royal funeral in April 2021, greeted each other ahead of the memorial service today

Four daughters: Prince Philip was raised separately from his four older sisters, pictured left-right: Sophia, Margarita, Cecilie, known as Cecile, and Theodora. The girls are pictured ahead of the 1922 wedding of Louis Mountbatten and Edwina Ashley, where they were bridesmaids

Four daughters: Prince Philip was raised separately from his four older sisters, pictured left-right: Sophia, Margarita, Cecilie, known as Cecile, and Theodora. The girls are pictured ahead of the 1922 wedding of Louis Mountbatten and Edwina Ashley, where they were bridesmaids

Troubles ahead: Philip, second from left, as a boy with his parents and four sisters, who adored him. They all married German aristocrats

Troubles ahead: Philip, second from left, as a boy with his parents and four sisters, who adored him. They all married German aristocrats

Prince Bernhard, 50, also a father of three, is a grandson of the Duke’s second sister, Theodora (known as ‘Dolla’).

Also in attendance was Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse, known as ‘Don’, 54, is the head of the House of Hesse, into which the Duke’s two younger sisters, Cecile and Sophie (known as ‘Tiny’) married. 

He was joined by his wife Countess Floria Franziska Marie-Luisa Erika von Faber-Castell. 

All these families enjoy so many precious recollections of the ‘Uncle Philip’, who thought nothing of popping over to Germany for a christening or a landmark birthday party for the offspring and relatives of his older sisters.

Prince Harry faces ‘lifetime of regret’ for missing memorial to his beloved grandfather

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle could ‘regret’ not attending the memorial service for his grandfather Prince Philip at Westminster Abbey tomorrow – and the Queen is likely to be ‘very upset’ but cannot change his mind, royal experts say.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are expected to remain at home in Montecito, California, while the rest of the Royal Family gather in London for the poignant event. 

Harry last returned to the UK eight months ago to unveil the statue of his late mother Diana, Princess of Wales in London on July 1 with his brother Prince William.

The Duke – one of the Queen and Philip’s eight grandchildren – is the only top-level royal not attending tomorrow’s service which was organised by the monarch.

Royal author Phil Dampier told MailOnline: ‘It’s very sad that Harry and Meghan won’t be at Prince Philip’s memorial service and I think one day Harry might regret it. He has said that he doesn’t feel safe without Scotland Yard security but to me that sounds like an excuse not to come back to the UK and indicates the rift with his blood family is still bad.

‘Harry was always very fond of his grandfather and was deeply honoured when he took over from him as Captain General of the Royal Marines, but sadly that didn’t last long. The pair attended some Remembrance Day events together and there was always a rapport between them, both being serving military men who had seen active service.’

Mr Dampier said that Harry ‘loved’ Philip’s sense of humour and praised him in interviews, adding that this makes his non-attendance ‘all the more mystifying and strange’. 

They were the kind-hearted, glamorous quartet of princesses who had doted on their boisterous little brother through an often troubled childhood.

The Duke never forgot that, according to Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg who last year told the Daily Mail: ‘It was such a joy having a conversation with him. His memory was extraordinary,’ he explained. ‘He could remember playing hide-and-seek in the castle when he was a boy, and he always enjoyed talking to the local people.

‘He could switch from German to English and back, whether he was talking about Winston Churchill or the local wildlife.’ 

The Duke’s death was also said to leave a huge hole among the broader continental cousinhood, who all adored the energetic, unstuffy uncle, great-uncle and cousin who always made a beeline for his younger relatives to hear their latest news.

For he was not only an enthusiastic participant in family gatherings. In fact, many refer to him as ‘the glue’ or ‘the bridge’ who has kept the current British Royal Family closely connected to the European cousinhood.

They are the ‘other’ royal family, the relatives who might not be household names in Britain but who, for generations, have happily slotted in at house parties or picnics at Balmoral, Sandringham and elsewhere. 

The horrse show was ‘the Duke’s week’ each spring, with plenty of Langenburgs, Badens, Hesses and Hanovers occupying the Windsor guest rooms.

At big family gatherings, whether in the UK or in Germany, there would always be a big crossover. At the celebrations for the golden or diamond wedding anniversaries of the Queen and the Duke, for example, the German relations were fully included. Similarly, many a German christening has featured a House of Windsor godparent at the font.

Prince Philip and his four sisters had grown up in the strange, unsettled world of peripatetic refugee royalty between the wars. They were all born into the Greek royal family, itself descended from the ruling house of Denmark, but had been driven into exile in 1922 after a military coup. 

Also in attendance today was Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, the widow of Lord Romsey, Earl Mountbatten’s grandson Norton Knatchbull.

Norton is the grandson of Lord Mountbatten – who was famously close to his nephew Prince Philip. Philip was Norton’s godson, while Norton is the godfather of Prince William. 

Also known as Lady Romsey and Lady Brabourne, Penny was a regular visitor at Wood Farm, the cottage on the edge of the Sandringham Estate in Norfolk where the Prince spent much of his time after retiring from public life in August 2017, and was thought to be one of his closest confidantes. 

Among the Duke of Edinburgh’s Greek relatives in attendance was be Queen Anne-Marie of the Hellenes, the last Queen of Greece and wife of King Constantine II, her children, Crown Prince Pavlos and Prince Philippos, and their respective wives.

Queen Anne-Marie is the daughter of King Frederick IX of Denmark and his wife Ingrid of Sweden, and the younger sister of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. She had to renounce her claim to the Danish throne on marrying Constantine II.

Queen Anne-Marie is a great-great granddaughter of Queen Victoria, making her a third cousin of both Prince Philip and the Queen.

King Constantine II was a first cousin once removed of Prince Philip; both were descended from King George I of Greece.

Among the Duke of Edinburgh's Greek relatives in attendance was be Queen Anne-Marie of the Hellenes, the last Queen of Greece and wife of King Constantine II, her children, Crown Prince Pavlos and Prince Philippos, and their respective wives. Philip and Anne-Marie are pictured in 1964

Among the Duke of Edinburgh’s Greek relatives in attendance was be Queen Anne-Marie of the Hellenes, the last Queen of Greece and wife of King Constantine II, her children, Crown Prince Pavlos and Prince Philippos, and their respective wives. Left today, right in 1964

Greece's former Queen Anne-Marie (left), Greece's Crown Prince Pavlos (second right) and Greece's Crown Princess Marie-Chantal leave after attending a Service of Thanksgiving for Prince Philip

Greece’s former Queen Anne-Marie (left), Greece’s Crown Prince Pavlos (second right) and Greece’s Crown Princess Marie-Chantal leave after attending a Service of Thanksgiving for Prince Philip

Their children also have ties to the royal family. Prince Pavlos is Prince Charles’s godson, while the Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Diana were both godparents to his younger brother, Prince Philippos.

Pavlos and Philippos will be joined at the service by their wives. Pavlos’ wife Marie-Chantal is a queen bee socialite who’s friends with Zoe de Givenchy, Tory Burch and the Italian fashion designer Valentino.

Meanwhile Philippos married wife Nina in three separate ceremonies in 2020 and 2021. Princess Eugenie, Princess Beatrice, and their husbands were all in attendance.

Flying the flag for Denmark was Queen Margrethe, who is known affectionately as ‘aunt Daisy’ by many European royals due to her close relationship with Philip.

The 81-year-old monarch will fly solo at the Service of Thanksgiving, although she is often joined at royal events by her son Frederik, Crown Prince of Denmark, and daughter-in-law Princess Mary.

Flying the flag for Denmark was Queen Margrethe, who is known affectionately as 'aunt Daisy' by many European royals due to her close relationship with Philip.

Flying the flag for Denmark was Queen Margrethe, who is known affectionately as ‘aunt Daisy’ by many European royals due to her close relationship with Philip.

Queen Margrethe II enjoys a close personal relationship with the Queen and was related to the Duke of Edinburgh through King Christian IX of Denmark.

King Christian IX – dubbed the ‘father-in-law of Europe’ due to his far-reaching progeny – was the great-great-grandfather of Queen Margrethe and the great-grandfather of the Duke of Edinburgh.

The Danish queen is also related to Queen Elizabeth through Queen Victoria.

Margrethe lost her husband Henrik, Prince Consort of Denmark, in 2018.

The Queen is back at Windsor Castle today with Prince Andrew having skipped several royal receptions after shedding tears for the Duke of Edinburgh at an extraordinary service in remembrance of his remarkable 99-year life of service to Britain and his wife.

Her Majesty became emotional in Westminster Abbey – where she married Prince Philip in November 1947 – having personally ensured her beloved husband’s final wishes were fulfilled after his covid-hit funeral left her sat alone without the rousing hymns and guests he loved so much.

Her Majesty was determined to be amongst the 1,800 guests despite the 95-year-old’s mobility problems that have prevented her doing a major public engagement away from Windsor Castle in nearly six months.

And in a move that royal watchers believe may have upset her son Prince Charles and grandson Prince William – both instrumental in the decision to take away the Duke of York’s ‘HRH’ – the Queen chose her second son to join her in the back of her royal car. 

Philip’s mother was Princess Alice of Battenberg, and his four sisters all married German aristocrats.

His German relations were banned from attending his wedding to Elizabeth in 1947 over perceived links to the Nazis in the wake of the Second World War. But after the Duke made clear he wanted German ‘blood to attend his funeral.  

Queen sheds a tear for beloved Philip: Emotional monarch wears green in tribute to late husband at Westminster Abbey memorial attended by Kate, Wills, Charles and Camilla… a year after sitting alone at his funeral at height of the pandemic 

 By MARTIN ROBINSON, CHIEF REPORTER and MARK DUELL and DANNY HUSSAIN FOR MAILONLINE

The Queen shed a tear for Prince Philip at an extraordinary service in remembrance of his remarkable life of service to Britain and his wife today.

Her Majesty stood in Westminster Abbey where she had personally ensured her beloved husband’s final wishes were fulfilled after his covid-hit funeral left her sat alone without the rousing hymns and guests he loved so much.

The 95-year-old monarch used a stick as she was walked to her seat by her disgraced son the Duke of York to give her ‘strength and stay’ Philip the final farewell he had wanted. The service was attended by the Royal Family and his relatives, friends and people who benefitted from his charities. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were the only senior royals not there.

Despite battling mobility problems, she stood to pray and sing anthems during a 40-minute service that her husband of 73 years had helped plan for before his death last April. But in a controversial decision she chose Prince Andrew to support her as she arrived and left the church, clutching his elbow with one hand and a walking stick with the other.

The Queen had stood with tears in her eyes as the 1,800-strong congregation sang Guide Me O Thou Great Redeemer before the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out to mark the end of the memorial service for the Duke of Edinburgh.

After she leant on Andrew as she walked back out of the church, the Queen appeared to grimace as she walked to the car hunched over with the Duke of York at her side guiding her towards the Bentley.

She appeared to be holding tightly to her stick and appeared to be making a great effort to get to the vehicle, concentrating very hard in taking each step. Once inside the car she appeared to be back to her normal composed self as the car slowly drove away. She waved to onlookers as she arrived and left the service.

The Queen and the packed abbey had listened as the Dean of Windsor paid tribute to Philip’s intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family.

The Right Reverend David Conner described the duke as a ‘remarkable man’ who was committed to ‘a host of down-to-earth enterprises’. He pointed out that the duke could be ‘abrupt’, and suggested that at times he could forget ‘just how intimidating he could be’.

Princess Beatrice was seen to give a small chuckle as the Dean remarked: ‘He could be somewhat sharp in pricking what he thought to be bubbles of pomposity or sycophancy.’ But then appeared to break down in tears, covering her face with the order of service.

The Queen, the Duchess of Cornwall and the Princess Royal were all dressed in dark green in a subtle tribute to Philip, whose livery colour was Edinburgh Green. A number of others throughout the congregation also wore the shade, including Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award holder Doyin Sonibare who delivered a special tribute about the effect Philip’s youth scheme had on her life.

Flowers at today’s service are a patriotic red, white and blue, at Her Majesty’s request. They included dendrobium orchids, which also featured in the Queen’s wedding bouquet, and eryngium – or sea holly – echoing the duke’s career in the Royal Navy and lifelong affection for the sea. There were also multiple tributes to his intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family and his country.

The Queen stood and shed a tear for her husband today at an extraordinary service in remembrance of his life

The Queen stood and shed a tear for her husband today at an extraordinary service in remembrance of his life

The Queen closed her eyes in prayer as she joined senior royals to pay tribute to Prince Philip at his memorial at Westminster Abbey The Queen was tearful as she attended the memorial service at Westminster Abbey today for her late husband Prince Philip

The Queen closed her eyes in prayer as she joined senior royals to pay tribute to Prince Philip at his memorial at Westminster Abbey. When she opened her eyes they appeared moist

55949151 10663365 image m 121 1648552666353

Her Majesty stands to sing surrounded by her family with the Duke of York also on the front row.From left to right, front row: Queen Elizabeth II, the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, the Princess Royal, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, the Duke of York, The Earl of Wessex, the Countess of Wessex, Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor and Viscount Severn. (Second row left to right) The Duke of Cambridge, Prince George, Princess Charlotte, the Duchess of Cambridge, Peter Phillips, Isla Phillips, Savannah Phillips, Mia Tindall, Zara Tindall and Mike Tindall

Princess Beatrice was overwhelmed by the service. Stood behind the Queen she cried and covered her face with the order of service Princess Beatrice was overwhelmed by the service. Stood behind the Queen she cried and covered her face with the order of service

Princess Beatrice was overwhelmed by the service. Stood behind the Queen she cried and covered her face with the order of service as her grandmother removed her glasses

Her Majesty walked with the help of a stick but stood without support sat next to Charles, Camilla, Anne and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence. Across the aisle was Prince Andrew

Her Majesty walked with the help of a stick but stood without support sat next to Charles, Camilla, Anne and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence. Across the aisle was Prince Andrew

The Queen arrives at the service holding the Duke of York by the elbow with her left hand and her stick with the right

The Queen arrives at the service holding the Duke of York by the elbow with her left hand and her stick with the right

Andrew escorted her to her seat in an extraordinary moment that may have upset other royals. None of the other royals appeared to look up when they arrived

Andrew escorted her to her seat in an extraordinary moment that may have upset other royals. None of the other royals appeared to look up when they arrived

Her Majesty had arrived at the side door of the church, allowing her to walk a shorter distance from Poets’ Corner to the front where she was surrounded by her children and grandchildren. She stood at various points in the service, despite her own admission recently that she is struggling to move.

Westminster Abbey was completely packed today to celebrate the 99-year life of Prince Philip as Her Majesty battled mobility issues and fought off covid to be there to say goodbye to her husband after 73 years of marriage.

The event, attended by most of the Duke of Edinburgh’s family and many of Europe’s most senior royals, is in the starkest of contrasts to his pared back funeral at Windsor last April when Her Majesty said goodbye to her strength and stay after 73 years of marriage.

The Queen finally decided to attend today’s service in Central London around two hours before but the coverage of the Service of Thanksgiving was dominated by her extraordinary decision to travel with her disgraced son Prince Andrew from Windsor Castle to Central London.

Timothy Laurence and Anne, Princess Royal, arriving ahead of the Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Prince Philip

Timothy Laurence and Anne, Princess Royal, arriving ahead of the Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Prince Philip

Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, arrive at Westminster Abbey

Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, arrive at Westminster Abbey

The Duke's family ahead of the service: In the second row is Peter Philips with daughters Savannah and Isla. Next to them is Mia Tindall with parents Zara Philips and Mike Tindall. In the front row are Prince Edward and Sophie Wessex with children Lady Louise and James, Viscount Severn

The Duke’s family ahead of the service: In the second row is Peter Philips with daughters Savannah and Isla. Next to them is Mia Tindall with parents Zara Philips and Mike Tindall. In the front row are Prince Edward and Sophie Wessex with children Lady Louise and James, Viscount Severn

The Cambridges arrived shortly after Prince Charles and Camilla ahead of today's memorial service for Prince Philip at Westminster Abbey

The Cambridges arrived shortly after Prince Charles and Camilla ahead of today’s memorial service for Prince Philip at Westminster Abbey

Kate Middleton arrives at Westminster Abbey for the memorial service to Prince Philip today. She was joined by Prince William and her children George and Charlotte

Kate Middleton arrives at Westminster Abbey for the memorial service to Prince Philip today. She was joined by Prince William and her children George and Charlotte

Princess Charlotte and Prince George sit with the mother the Duchess of Cambridge during today's service at Westminster Abbey

Princess Charlotte and Prince George sit with the mother the Duchess of Cambridge during today’s service at Westminster Abbey

The Queen remained seated during the service with aides taking special measures to ensure her comfort after recent heath issues

The Queen remained seated during the service with aides taking special measures to ensure her comfort after recent heath issues

Queen Máxima and King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands left the service at Westminster Abbey arm-in-arm

Queen Máxima and King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands left the service at Westminster Abbey arm-in-arm 

Queen Letizia of Spain, 49, left the service for Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh in an emerald dress

Despite her frailty, Queen Elizabeth II stands during a Service of Thanksgiving for the life of the Duke of Edinburgh, at Westminster Abbey today

Her Majesty was determined to be amongst the 1,800 guests despite the 95-year-old’s mobility problems that have prevented her doing a major public engagement away from Windsor Castle in nearly six months. The Tindalls were the first close family to arrive, followed Princess Anne, the Wessexes, Prince Charles and his wife Camilla and then the Cambridges, who were with their children George and Charlotte. The Queen was the last to arrive with Andrew.

It was a move that royal watchers believe may have upset her son Prince Charles and grandson Prince William – both instrumental in the decision to take away the Duke of York’s ‘HRH’.

The Queen chose her second son to join her in the back of her royal car for the 22-mile journey and he was also given a front row in the church, right next to his other siblings at the service just weeks after he paid millions to one of Jeffrey Epstein’s sex slaves, Virginia Roberts Giuffre, who accused him of having sex with her three times when she was trafficked to London aged 17.

The Queen’s state limousine arrived at Poets’ Yard entrance with Andrew sat beside her. As they walked through the famous section of the abbey towards her seat, in a small procession, the monarch held onto her son’s elbow with her left hand and had a walking stick in her right.

They walked at a slow but steady pace both looking ahead, and at the end of the aisle they separated – with Andrew giving a last glance to his mother as she turned right. After the first hymn, Charles, who was sat next to her mother, could be seen leaning over to speak to the Queen seated next to him – but it is not clear what was said. The Queen then delved into her black Launer handbag for her glasses to read the order of service.

After the 40 minute service, Her Majesty was escorted out of the abbey by the Duke of York. As the monarch stopped to greet Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award holder Doyin Sonibare, Andrew stood back and at one point broke into a smile.

The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall were the first to leave Westminster Abbey alongside the abbey’s chapter.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge followed. All four royals waved at the crowd outside as they were driven away in black cars.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-10663319/Prince-Philips-family-arrive-Westminster-Abbey-Duke-Edinburghs-memorial-service.html